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News Report on Public Confidence
in the State of the Nation
2013
Chair, Advisory Board

Daniel Yankelovich
Public Agenda

Advisory Board

Jonathan Brent
Yivo Institute

John Donatich
Yale University Press

Fredrica S. Friedman
Fredrica S. Friedman & Co., Inc.

Richard D. Heffner
Rutgers University

Thomas E. Mann
The Brookings Institution

Norman J. Ornstein
American Enterprise Institute

Hugh Price
Former President
National Urban League

Jeffrey Rosen
George Washington University

Ian Shapiro
Yale University

Alan Wolfe
Boston College

Ruth A. Wooden
Public Agenda

Daniel Yankelovich is Chair of the Advisory Board of the Future of American Democracy Foundation. The nationÂ’s leading analyst of public opinion data, he is co-founder and chairman of Public Agenda, and founder of Yankelovich, Skelly and White, DYG, Inc, and Viewpoint Learning. He founded The New York Times/Yankelovich Poll, which subsequently became the CBS Poll. He has served as Chairman of the Educational Testing Service and was a founding president of the Society for the Advancement of Socio-Economics. He also served as a member of the Board of Directors of CBS, US West, Meredith Corporation, Arkla, Reliance, and Loral Space and Communications. Mr. Yankelovich is also a director of the Kettering Foundation, the Institute for Global Ethics, and the Japan Society. He has been Research Professor of Psychology at New York University, Professor of Psychology on the Graduate Faculty at the New School for Social Research and a Trustee of Brown University. The author of nine books, including Coming to Public Judgment: Making Democracy Work in a Complex World, and numerous essays, Mr. Yankelovich is known for his prescient analysis of America's changing values and mores. In 1995 he was awarded the prestigious Helen Dinerman Award by the World Association of Public Opinion Research (WAPOR). His new book -- The Magic of Dialogue -- was published by Simon & Schuster. A Phi Beta Kappa graduate of Harvard University, Mr. Yankelovich was the Rantoul Fellow in Clinical Psychology at the Harvard Graduate School of Arts and Sciences. Mr. Yankelovich holds honorary doctorates from Washington University, George Washington University, and St. Bonaventure University. He was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1999.
Jonathan Brent is Executive Director of the YIVO Institute. He was formerly director of Yale University Press and founder of its distinguished Annals of Communism series. He holds a Ph.D. from the University of Chicago. He is the author, with Vladimir Naumov, of Stalin's Last Crime : The Plot Against the Jewish Doctors, 1948-1953 (Harper Collins, 2003).
John Donatich is Director of Yale University Press. He previously served as publisher and vice president of Basic Books, where he was responsible for the publication of over one hundred nonfiction and scholarly books annually. He has been responsible for building the teams that contributed to the growth and financial strength of this well-regarded publishing house. Prior to joining Basic Books, Donatich was at HarperCollins from 1992-1996. Initially he served as Director of National Accounts, and then Vice President and Director of Product and Marketing Development. From 1989-1992, he was Director of National Accounts for the Putnam Publishing Group.
Fredrica S. Friedman is President of Fredrica S. Friedman & Co., Inc., a literary management agency. Prior to establishing her own firm, Ms. Friedman was the Editorial Director, Associate Publisher and Vice President of Little, Brown & Co., a division of Time Warner. Ms. Friedman is the Co-Founder of WomenÂ’s Campaign International, a U.S. nonprofit organization dedicated to the empowerment of women in the emerging democracies. Ms. Friedman is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations, the WomenÂ’s Forum, the International WomenÂ’s Forum, the WomenÂ’s Leadership Forum, and is on the Executive Board of Directors of the WomenÂ’s Campaign Fund, WomenÂ’s Campaign International, and the International Center for Research on Women. Ms. Friedman holds a B.A. degree from Vassar College in Political Science, and an M.A. degree in International Relations from Columbia University.
Richard D. Heffner is University Professor of Communications and Public Policy at Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey and host and producer of the public television program “The Open Mind”. From 1974 to 1994, he served as Chairman of the Board and Administrator of the motion picture industry's voluntary film classification and rating system. He recently completed a narrative of his Hollywood years for Columbia University's distinguished Oral History Project. His book A Conversational History of Modern America, derived from his broadcast interviews with important thought leaders over the past half-century, was published by Carroll & Graf late in 2003. Trained as an American historian, Mr. Heffner is also the author of A Documentary History of the United States, which recently appeared in an expanded and revised Seventh Edition, and is the editor of Alexis de Tocqueville's classic Democracy In America, both published by Penguin Putnam. Mr. Heffner's Conversations With Elie Wiesel was published in 2001 by Random House's Schocken Books. A Phi Beta Kappa honors graduate of Columbia (A.B., 1946; M.A., 1947), Mr. Heffner has taught history and political science at the University of California at Berkeley, Rutgers, Columbia, Sarah Lawrence, New York University and the New School for Social Research. He holds honorary doctorates from the State University of New York and from Long Island University. He has written widely for such publications as the New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, the Washington Post, Saturday Review, the American Historical Review. His lectures and seminars -- particularly overseas for the State Department in such countries as the former USSR, Israel, Germany, Greece, Japan, and Italy--range from important historical events to media matters. Mr. Heffner began his broadcasting career in radio (1953) with “History In The News” on WMCA, New York, and then worked for ABC radio, moving to NBC television in 1954. He also served as Director of Public Affairs Programs at WNBC-TV. In 1959 he went to CBS, first as Editorial Consultant to the CBS Editorial Board, and then as Director of Special Projects for the CBS Television Network. He was General Manager of WNET from 1961 to 1963. He has also directed such foundation projects as the Twentieth Century Fund's Commission on Campaign Costs in the Electronic Era (1968-69), and the Ford Foundation's study of American television's environmental content (1970-72).
Thomas E. Mann is the W. Averell Harriman Chair and Senior Fellow in Governance Studies at The Brookings Institution. Between 1987 and 1999, he was Director of Governmental Studies at Brookings. Before that, Mann was executive director of the American Political Science Association. Born on September 10, 1944, in Milwaukee, he earned his B.A. in political science at the University of Florida and his M.A. and Ph.D. at the University of Michigan. He first came to Washington in 1969 as a Congressional Fellow in the offices of Senator Philip A. Hart and Representative James G. O'Hara. Mann has taught at Princeton University, Johns Hopkins University, Georgetown University, the University of Virginia and American University; conducted polls for congressional candidates; worked as a consultant to IBM and the Public Broadcasting Service; chaired the Board of Overseers of the National Election Studies; and served as an expert witness in the constitutional defense of the McCain-Feingold campaign finance law. He lectures frequently in the United States and abroad on American politics and public policy and is also a regular contributor to newspaper stories and television and radio programs on politics and governance. Mann is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and a member of the Council on Foreign Relations. He is a recipient of the American Political Science AssociationÂ’s Frank J. Goodnow and Charles E. Merriam Awards. Mann's published works include Unsafe at Any Margin: Interpreting Congressional Elections; Vital Statistics on Congress; The New Congress; A Question of Balance: The President, the Congress and Foreign Policy; Media Polls in American Politics; Renewing Congress; Congress, the Press, and the Public; Intensive Care: How Congress Shapes Health Policy; Campaign Finance Reform: A Sourcebook; The Permanent Campaign and Its Future; Inside the Campaign Finance Battle: Court Testimony on the New Reforms; The New Campaign Finance Sourcebook; and Party Lines: Competition, Partisanship and Congressional Redistricting. He has also written numerous scholarly articles and opinion pieces on various aspects of American politics, including elections, political parties, Congress, the presidency and public policymaking. He is currently working on projects dealing with redistricting, election reform, and campaign finance, and writing a book on Congress with Norman Ornstein.
Chair, Advisory Board

Daniel Yankelovich
Public Agenda

Advisory Board

Jonathan Brent
Yivo Institute

John Donatich
Yale University Press

Fredrica S. Friedman
Fredrica S. Friedman & Co., Inc.

Richard D. Heffner
Rutgers University

Thomas E. Mann
The Brookings Institution

Norman J. Ornstein
American Enterprise Institute

Hugh Price
Former President
National Urban League

Jeffrey Rosen
George Washington University

Ian Shapiro
Yale University

Alan Wolfe
Boston College

Ruth A. Wooden
Public Agenda

Norman J. Ornstein is a resident scholar at the American Enterprise Institute for Public Policy Research. He also serves as an election analyst for CBS News. In addition, Ornstein is a member of its Board of Contributors of USA Today and writes a weekly column called "Congress Inside Out" for Roll Call newspaper in Washington. He has written for the New York Times, Washington Post, Wall Street Journal, Foreign Affairs, and other major publications, and regularly appears on such television programs as The NewsHour with Jim Lehrer, Nightline, and Charlie Rose. He serves as senior counselor to the Continuity of Government Commission, working to ensure that our institutions of government can be maintained in the event of a terrorist attack on Washington; his efforts in this area are recounted in a profile of him in the June 2003 Atlantic Monthly. His campaign finance working group of scholars and practitioners helped shape the McCain/Feingold law, that reformed the campaign financing system. Legal Times referred to him as "a principal drafter of the law" and his role in its design and enactment was profiled in the February 2004 issue of Washington Lawyer. He is also co-directing a multi-year effort, called the Transition to Governing Project, to create a better climate for governing in the era of permanent political campaigning. He is a member of the Board of Directors of the Public Broadcasting Service (PBS) and the Campaign Legal Center. He was elected a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2004. His many books include The Permanent Campaign and Its Future; Intensive Care: How Congress Shapes Health Policy, both with Thomas E. Mann; and Debt and Taxes: How America Got Into Its Budget Mess and What to Do About It, with John H. Makin.
Hugh Price is a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution and former president and chief executive officer of the National Urban League. Price was a senior officer at the Rockefeller Foundation, where he managed domestic initiatives in education for at-risk youth. After graduating from Yale Law School, he began his career as a neighborhood attorney in New Haven. While in Connecticut, Price also served as Human Resources Administrator for the City of New Haven. Price had a distinguished career in journalism, writing editorials for The New York Times in the late 1970s and later for WNET/Thirteen, America's largest public television station. As president of the National Urban League, Price enlarged the League's endowment, launched the historic Campaign for African-American Achievement, started the "Achievement Matters" public service campaign and revived Opportunity -- the publication of the National Urban League.
Jeffrey Rosen is Professor of Law at George Washington University Law School, where he teaches constitutional law, criminal procedure, and the law of privacy. He is also the legal affairs editor of The New Republic. His first book, The Unwanted Gaze: The Destruction of Privacy in America (2001) was called by the New York Times “the definitive text on privacy perils in the digital age.” His latest book, The Naked Crowd: Reclaiming Security and Freedom in an Anxious Age (2004) was called by the Harvard Law Review a “thoughtful and engaging read ... [that] provides much-needed depth to the debate over balancing privacy and security in an age of terrorism.” He is a summa cum laude graduate of Harvard College, he was a Marshall Scholar at Oxford University and a graduate of Yale Law School. His essays and book reviews have appeared in many publications, including the New York Times Magazine, the Atlantic Monthly, and the New Yorker, where he has been a staff writer. He is a frequent contributor to National Public Radio.
Ian Shapiro, Co-Chair of the Executive Committee of the Future of American Democracy Foundation, is Sterling Professor of Political Science and Henry R. Luce Director of the Yale Center for International and Area Studies. He holds a Ph.D. from Yale University and a J.D. from Yale Law School. His research interests include the methods of social inquiry; theories of justice, democracy, and distribution; and the prospects for sustainable democracy in countries that are emerging from authoritarianism. Shapiro is author of The Evolution of Rights in Liberal Theory; Political Criticism; Democracy's Place; Democratic Justice; The Moral Foundations of Politics; The State of Democratic Theory; and The Flight From Reality in the Human Sciences. He is co-author, with Donald Green, of Pathologies of Rational Choice Theory and, with Michael Graetz, of Death by a Thousand Cuts: The Fight Over Taxing Inherited Wealth. He served as editor of NOMOS from 1992-2000, has edited numerous other collections, and has edited the Cambridge University Press series on Contemporary Political Theory since 1998. Shapiro was elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2000, and has been a Fellow of the Carnegie Corporation, the Guggenheim Foundation, and the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences in Palo Alto. He has held visiting appointments at the University of Cape Town and Nuffield College, Oxford.
Alan Wolfe is Professor of Political Science and Director of the Boisi Center for Religion and American Public Life at Boston College. His most recent books include Return to Greatness: How America Lost Its Sense of Purpose and What it Needs to Do to Recover It (2005), The Transformation of American Religion: How We actually Practice our Faith (2003), and An Intellectual in Public (2003). He is the author or editor of more than ten other books including Marginalized in the Middle (1997), One Nation, After All (1998), Moral Freedom: The Search for Virtue in a World of Choice (2001) and School Choice: The Moral Debate (editor, 2002). Both One Nation, After All and Moral Freedom were selected as New York Times Notable Books of the Year. His current project is a book dealing with the question of whether American democracy still works. A contributing editor of The New Republic and The Wilson Quarterly, Professor Wolfe writes often for those publications as well as for Commonweal, The New York Times, Harper's, The Atlantic Monthly, The Washington Post, and other magazines and newspapers. He served as an advisor to President Clinton in preparation for his 1995 State of the Union address and has lectured widely at American and European universities. Professor Wolfe has been the recipient of grants from the Russell Sage Foundation, the Templeton Foundation, and the Lilly Endowment. He has twice conducted programs under the auspices of the U.S. State Department that bring Muslim scholars to the United States to learn about separation of Church and State. He is listed in Who's Who in the World, Who's Who in America and Contemporary Authors.
Ruth A. Wooden is President Emeritus of Public Agenda, a leading public opinion analysis organization co-founded by Cyrus Vance, former Secretary of State and Daniel Yankelovich, the nationÂ’s leading analyst of public opinion. Before joining Public Agenda, Ms. Wooden was Executive Vice President-Senior Counselor at the international public relations firm of Porter Novelli where she led the Cause-Related Marketing Practice. Before joining Porter Novelli in 2001, she served as volunteer President of the National Parenting Association. From 1987 to 1999, she was President of The Advertising Council, the nationÂ’s leading producer of public service announcements. During Ms. WoodenÂ’s tenure, the Ad Council collaborated with Public Agenda on the ground-breaking study Kids These Days: What Americans Really Think About the Next Generation which was named by Congressional Quarterly as one of the 50 most important documents of 1995. Ms. Wooden currently serves on the Boards of U.S. Trust Company; Research!America; Phoenix House Foundation; Demos; and Civic Ventures. She is a member of Advisory Committees serving AmericaÂ’s Promise; the Office of National Drug Control Policy, the Harvard Business SchoolÂ’s Initiative on Social Enterprise and Columbia UniversityÂ’s Mailman School of Public Health and its School of Health Sciences. She is the recipient of the Prudential Prize in Non-Profit Leadership and the Matrix Award from New York Women in Communications. Ms. Wooden was awarded an honorary doctorate from Northeastern University in 1994.
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